Best-Middle-Grade-Novels-in-Verse
  1. Love that dogLove that Dog
    “I guess it does
    look like a poem
    when you see it
    typed up
    like that.”
    Jack hates poetry. Only girls write it and every time he tries to, his brain feels empty. But his teacher, Ms. Stretchberry, won’t stop giving her class poetry assignments — and Jack can’t avoid them. But then something amazing happens. The more he writes, the more he learns he does have something to say.
  2. heartbeatHeartbeat
    Newbery Medalist Creech (“Walk Two Moons”) masterfully weaves this story, told in free verse, about a young girl finding her identity and learning how it fits within the many rhythms of life.Run run run.That’s what twelve-year-old Annie loves to do. When she’s barefoot and running, she can hear her heart beating . . . thump-THUMP, thump-THUMP. It’s a rhythm that makes sense in a year when everything’s shifting: Her mother is pregnant, her grandfather is forgetful, and her best friend, Max, is always moody. Everything changes over time, just like the apple Annie’s been assigned to draw. But as she watches and listens, Annie begins to understand the many rhythms of life, and how she fits within them.Twelve-year-old Annie ponders the many rhythms of life the year that her mother becomes pregnant, her grandfather begins faltering, and her best friend (and running partner) becomes distant.
  3. inside out and back againInside Out and Back Again
    For all the ten years of her life, Hà has only known Saigon: the thrills of its markets, the joy of its traditions, and the warmth of her friends close by. But now the Vietnam War has reached her home. Hà and her family are forced to flee as Saigon falls, and they board a ship headed toward hope. In America, Hà discovers the foreign world of Alabama: the coldness of its strangers, the dullness of its food . . . and the strength of her very own family.
  4. The crossoverThe Crossover
    “With a bolt of lightning on my kicks . . .The court is SIZZLING. My sweat is DRIZZLING. Stop all that quivering. Cuz tonight I’m delivering,” announces dread-locked, 12-year old Josh Bell. He and his twin brother Jordan are awesome on the court. But Josh has more than basketball in his blood, he’s got mad beats, too, that tell his family’s story in verse, in this fast and furious middle grade novel of family and brotherhood.
    Josh and Jordan must come to grips with growing up on and off the court to realize breaking the rules comes at a terrible price, as their story’s heart-stopping climax proves a game-changer for the entire family.
  5. locomotionLocomotion
    When Lonnie Collins Motion “Locomotion” was seven years old, his life changed forever. Now he’s eleven, and his life is about to change again. His teacher, Ms. Marcus, is showing him ways to put his jumbled feelings on paper. And suddenly, Lonnie has a whole new way to tell the world about his life, his friends, his little sister Lili, and even his foster mom, Miss Edna, who started out crabby but isn’t so bad after all. Jacqueline Woodson’s novel-in-poems is humorous, heartbreaking . . . a triumph.
  6. Forget-Me-NotForget Me Not
    A girl with Tourette syndrome starts a new school and tries to hide her quirks in this debut middle-grade novel in verse.Calliope June has Tourette syndrome. Sometimes she can’t control the noises that come out of her mouth, or even her body language. When she and her mother move yet again, she tries to hide her TS. But soon the kids in her class realize she’s different. Only her neighbor, who is also the class president, sees her as she truly is—a quirky kid, and a good friend. But is he brave enough to take their friendship public?As Callie navigates school, she must also face her mother’s new relationship and the fact that she might be moving again—just as she’s starting to make friends and finally accept her differences. This story of being true to yourself will speak to a wide audience.
  7. House ArrestHouse Arrest
    Stealing is bad.
    Yeah.
    I know.
    But my brother Levi is always so sick, and his medicine is always so expensive.I didn’t think anyone would notice,
    if I took that credit card,
    if, in one stolen second,
    I bought Levi’s medicine.But someone did notice.
    Now I have to prove I’m not a delinquent, I’m not a total bonehead.That one quick second turned into
    juvie
    a judge
    a year of house arrest,
    a year of this court-ordered journal,
    a year to avoid messing up
    and being sent back to juvie
    so fast my head will spin.It’s only 1 year.
    Only 52 weeks.
    Only 365 days.
    Only 8,760 hours.
    Only 525,600 minutes.

    What could go wrong?

  8. diamond willowDiamond Willow
    There’s
    more to me than
    most people
    see.Twelve-year-old Willow would rather blend in than stick out. But she still wants to be seen for who she is. She wants her parents to notice that she is growing up. She wants her best friend to like her better than she likes a certain boy. She wants, more than anything, to mush the dogs out to her grandparents’ house, by herself, with Roxy in the lead. But sometimes when it’s just you, one mistake can have frightening consequences . . . And when Willow stumbles, it takes a surprising group of friends to help her make things right again.Using diamond-shaped poems inspired by forms found in polished diamond willow sticks, Helen Frost tells the moving story of Willow and her family. Hidden messages within each diamond carry the reader further, into feelings Willow doesn’t reveal even to herself.
    Diamond Willow is a 2009 Bank Street – Best Children’s Book of the Year.
  9. the last fifth grade of emerson elementaryThe Last Fifth Grade of Emerson Elementary
    Laura Shovan’s engaging, big-hearted debut is a time capsule of one class’s poems during a transformative school year. Families change and new friendships form as these terrific kids grow up and move on in this whimsical novel-in-verse about finding your voice and making sure others hear it.Eighteen kids,
    one year of poems,
    one school set to close.
    Two yellow bulldozers
    crouched outside,
    ready to eat the building
    in one greedy gulp.But look out, bulldozers.
    Ms. Hill’s fifth-grade class
    has plans for you.
    They’re going to speak up
    and work together
    to save their school.
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